All The Things We Never Knew by Sheila Hamilton

( ) The author of this book is an extremely successful television reporter and radio show host. She writes this book while healing from her (separated) husband’s suicide. He suffered from bipolar II disorder, and the damage from his illness wreaks endless havoc on their family. Bipolar Disorder generally is accompanied by symptoms that go…

The Immortalists by Chloe Benjamin

( ) This novel centers around a family of four children. These four siblings ask for their dates of death from a fortune teller. Their lives play out after that occurrence, but the idea of when they will die, and how, always tugs at the back of their minds. Many of the siblings make very…

We Are the Luckiest by Laura McKowen

() This is a book about the author’s struggles with alcoholism and recovery. Most importantly, her realization that recovering addicts are actually “the luckiest ones” because they are forced to face life with brutal honesty. Recovery forces the individual to confront not only themselves with complete clarity, but also the imperfections of others. It requires…

Shockaholic by Carrie Fisher

( ) The title of this book, Shockaholic, has double meanings within Fisher’s writing. She discusses at length the ECT (electric shock) treatments she’s received for her depression and how they affect her memory. In addition, she delves into examples of her comically shocking people within social settings. Why these stories are especially touching for…

Let Go Now by Karen Casey

() This book is good conceptually: letting go and accepting that others’ actions are not something you can control. Basically, worrying less about others and more about ourselves. Detachment as the purest form of love and freedom! Unfortunately, it feels a bit like a lesson that can be shared within a few pages rather than…

Whistleblower by Susan Fowler

( ) This is a first-person narrative about the very real whistleblowing scandal that occurred in the deeply toxic, male-centric, startup culture of the Silicon Valley ridesharing company, Uber. It is written by the whistleblower herself, Susan Fowler. What I love most about this book is that the author is a classic but highly rare…

A Tragic Kind of Wonderful by Eric Lindstrom

( ) What I love most about this book is that it doesn’t try to portray a biased angle on mental illness. Instead, it attempts to illustrate bipolar disorder in all its unique, individualistic, but also consequential glory. The main character is a teenage girl who hasn’t yet told her closest companions about her illness….

The Disordered Mind by Eric Kandel

( ) Although it was often difficult to follow some of the in-depth biological descriptions that this book delves into, the high-level lessons were very intriguing. Science studies abnormal brains, and through this research we end up discovering more truths about normal brains as well. The most interesting fact that I gleamed from this book…

Quit Like a Woman by Holly Whitaker

( ) The author of this book chronicles her long journey towards sobriety. During this time, she discovers that the foundational principles that Alcoholics Anonymous were built on don’t resonate with her; they were built by and for the white male ruling class during a time period of extreme patriarchy and racial discrimination. They haven’t…

Such a Fun Age by Kiley Reid

() The main character here, Emira, is a 25-year-old black woman that is working as a babysitter despite being overqualified as a typist/transcriptionist. The mother she works for, Alix, makes her income on her own female-empowerment brand and letter-writing skills. One night, Emira is called on last minute to babysit due to a family emergency….